The Important Things to Know About Spray Foam Insulation 

The use of spray foam insulation started in the 40s, but mostly for aircraft. Continuous innovation with this product has triggered its increased popularity in residential and commercial applications over the past 30 years. The fast growth of the use of spray foam insulation in the construction industry has ranked the material alongside traditional types of insulation, all because it can provide superior thermal comfort to the building. 

  

Questions about spray foam insulation arise, like if there are various types of applications available. How does spray foam insulation meet the current building standards when the building codes change? Those are the important things that you need to know about this popular insulation material. Learning more about spray foam insulation makes it easier for you to make the decision in favor of it.  

Understanding Spray Foam Installation 

Spray foam insulation, or just spray insulation, is composed of two liquid insulation materials that insulate and seal the air wherever it’s used. The liquids are separated until they are applied on the job site by a professional spray foam installer. Such liquids pass through a hose all the way to the spray gun. They are combined through heating to create a foam-like substance. The foam spreads in seconds, filling the cavity’s surface.  The foam can expand up to 100x its original size, depending on what type is used. 

Over the years, the invention of the spray foam insulation has been applied to different types of spray insulation. Closed-cell and open-cell spray foam are used primarily used in residential and commercial properties, while spray separation with high density can be used as roofing foam in industrial and commercial structures.  

For interior applications like roof decks, wall cavities, attics, crawl spaces, and basement walls, open-cell sprayed-in foam insulation is normally used as it’s a highly flexible low-density material. The open cell structure is a low-density foam insulation that allows moisture permeability to help manage the wall assembly’s moisture through a two-directional drying process. 

Closed Cell Spray Insulation Quick Facts  

Closed-cell spray foam insulation is a medium-density insulation material that can be used indoors and outdoors. It’s has a higher R-value for every inch, thus making it the best one to meet the building code specifications for smaller areas requiring maximum R-value. Consult with a professional insulation installer if you need to comply with a certain R-value rating for your building.  

Spray foam insulation is suited for indoor and outdoor applications, offering a variety of benefits compared to conventional fibrous materials. The advantages of spray foam insulation are bi-directional drying, high R-value, mold resistance, soundproofing, and low installation cost.  

Since spray foam insulation has a lot of advantages over traditional types of insulation, closed-cell types go beyond that by offering even more advantages. Even if it costs higher than the others, it offers additional benefits such as waterproofing, energy efficiency compliant, and higher strength and resistance factor. If you need to know more about spray foam insulation Jackson MI, you are highly encouraged to talk to a licensed professional about it.  

 

 

Things to Consider When Insulating Your Attic 

For those who don’t know, if your house is not insulated, around 25% of heat is lost through the roof. Insulating your flat roof, attic, or loft is an effective and simple way to lower your heating bills and lower your heat loss.  

 

Whether you choose spray foam insulation California or other methods, attic insulation will last for a lot of years and it will pay for itself a lot of times.  

Selecting Attic Insulation 

Your attic should be easy to insulate if it is easy to access and has no condensation or damp issues. You can even insulate it yourself in almost every case.  

You can utilize rolls of mineral wool insulation if access is simple and your attic joists are standard.  

Here are several things to think about when installing attic insulation: 

  • Room-in Roof 

You’ve got to ensure that every ceiling and wall between an unheated and heated room is insulated if you want to utilize your attic as a living space.  

  • You can insulate a flat ceiling like a regular attic. 
  • You can insulate vertical walls just like a warm roof. 
  • You can insulate a sloping ceiling just like a warm roof. However, you have to layer it with plasterboard on the interior side of the insulation. 

You have to ensure you insulate every area of the ceiling and wall around any dormer window. Also, you need to utilize high-performance glazing for your skylights or windows. 

  • Warm Attic 

Fitting the insulation over and between the rafters is another way to insulate your attic. For those who don’t know, the sloping timbers that make up the roof are called the rafters. You can utilize rigid insulation board. However, you have to cut it properly to size. On the other hand, you can use spray foam insulation between the rafters.  

You’ll require a professional to insulate the roof whichever technique you utilize. This isn’t a DIY project. 

  • Storage Space 

You will have to place boards over the joists if you are planning to use the attic or loft for storing items. Unluckily, the insulation will not be thick enough if you insulate only between the joists before placing boards.  

You can increase the floor level so that you could fit enough mineral wool under the new floor level. This will help you get enough insulation. To prevent condensation on the underside of the boards, it is crucial to leave a ventilated air gap between the boards and the insulation.  

Whenever you fit the boards on top, you’ve got to ensure you do not squeeze the mineral wool. If that happens, it will only lower its insulation value. 

  • Hard-to-Access Attic 

You will have to hire an expert to have blown insulation if your loft is difficult to access. They will utilize a unique tool to blow the right insulation material into any hard-to-reach places. They might utilize polyurethane foam, treated cellulose, or mineral wool fiber. All of these will depend greatly on the material that your loft will need.